Insidious: The Last Key, 2018

© Universal Pictures & © Sony Pictures Releasing International


Drive-thru horror.

Leigh Whannell (Upgrade, 2018) made an entry into the world of horror films with a vicious, torture-porn, truth or dare, dare or die, live or die, the choice is yours; absolutely yours, attitude – as if John Kramer did not have to do anything with the complex contraptions that he painstakingly designed and built in his basement after a random asshole did this random something, which became the catalyst for everything genre-purgatory

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Dr. Elise Rainier (LIN SHAYE) and Tucker (ANGUS SAMPSON) investigate the unthinkable in “Insidious: The Last Key.” In the supernatural thriller, brilliant parapsychologist Dr. Rainier faces her most fearsome and personal haunting yet: in her own family home.

James Wan (Aquaman, 2018) and Whannell made an impression, with a maniacal, intelligent-bloody inkling, a cancer patient nursing malice, the kind that brings down empires; wipes entire races out of existence; a kind of malice that decides heir to thrones, for the malevolence may be expressed, ascribed to or tainted at any cost and even perpetuated never to be fully taken through, but whose thought is enough to wound the motives, keep the abrasion from healing completely (it creates a contradiction that warrants a keen study) – a key implanted behind the eye-socket. The malice is most evident in the film being reviewed here. 

Insidious: The Last Key plays in a similar vein to vendetta themed films that serve the purpose akin to fast food, that too ‘on the go’ and not dine-in; that would take too much time and resources and it would not change or make the food any better or more nutritious; it will remain the same whether you take off with it or decide to sit for a while, relax, catch the breath, only to be left breathless after the experience. Not every time though, just like a Kiddy Meal with a toy that your child may or may not want or like.

Lin Shaye (Insidious: Chapter 2, 2013) is back as Elise the demon hunter or more accurately, with a dash of dark sophistication, a parapsychologist. This is her film from start to finish, the final film in the franchise where the protagonist faces her deepest, darkest fears by visiting her childhood home; house,

It was never a home. 

Elise Rainier

If she wasn’t Elise the demon hunter, she would be teaming up with the duo or trio trying to take down the queen with a disturbingly overt obsession with mirrors or a mirror that talks back or with the huntsman from Asgard to send a certain witch Furiosa back to hell or Furnace Creek, Death Valley, California in the summers.

So, no matter how ‘drive-thru’ the horror picture is, there is a sense of irrevocability to this one. Director Adam Robitel (The Taking of Deborah Logan, 2014), seems to have a penchant for night vision whose application leaves the film looking a sickly green, even with the emphasis on red doors and a demon that might just be Darth Maul

The Last Key is a fun ride, with enough humor to provide relief during or after the scariest moments. Moments that are easy to miss, when the viewer is busy trying to open and sort the contents of old suitcases stacked on top of each other in narrow tunnels. 

This one also establishes a senior citizen as a lead in a horror film and brings the franchise full circle, whether you like it or not, with a twist the filmmakers can proudly call their own. 

“You mean there’s a demon standing right behind me at this moment?”
“And screaming.”
“And screaming, of course”

Full circles representing rings and all and what have you.

Scary enough to keep the horror fan enough happy and also fans of the light-weight horror genre, the ‘drive-thru’ horror flick. 

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Melissa (Spencer Locke) could reeaaally use that key right about now, in Insidious: The Last Key.

Do give it a watch, even if only for closure purpose.

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